Thurgood Marshall(7/2/1908 - 1/24/1993)

Thurgood Marshall was an American jurist and the first African American to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States. Before becoming a judge, he was a lawyer who was best remembered for his high success rate in arguing before the Supreme Court and for the victory in Brown v. Board of Education. He was nominated to the court by President Lyndon Johnson in 1967.

Until his retirement from the highest court in the land, Justice Marshall established a record for supporting the voiceless American. Having honed his skills since the case against the University of Maryland, he developed a profound sensitivity to injustice by way of the crucible of racial discrimination in this country. As an Associate Supreme Court Justice, Thurgood Marshall leaves a legacy that expands that early sensitivity to include all of America's voiceless. Justice Marshall died on January 24, 1993.


  • Today, 9/25, In History

    in 1974 - Barbara Hancock becomes first African American woman named a White House Fellow

  • To Inspire You

    We talk a lot about Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., but it's time to be like them, as strong as them. They were mortal men like us and every one of us can be like them. I don't want to be a role model. I just want to be someone who says, this is who I am, this is what I do. I say what's on my mind.



    Tupac Shakur

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Welcome To Our Web Site

Originally called the Rhode Island Black Lawyers Association, the Thurgood Marshall Law Society (TMLS) was reorganized and renamed in 2003. TMLS exists to promote African Americans in the legal profession, whether they are law students, attorneys, or judges. While the Thurgood Marshall Law Society primarily serves African-American attorneys in Rhode Island, membership is open to all lawyers licensed to practice law in Rhode Island, regardless of their ethnicity.

In Memorium